Tuesday, February 22, 2011

The Classy Bookshelf

Happy Tuesday friends, welcome to another edition of The Classy Bookshelf.

Get your reading lists out (Goodreads anyone?) because this week's two books are a must-read in my opinion!

Because I had loved my last experience with SMC graduate Adriana Trigiani, I was super-pumped to read her newest series. Very Valentine and Brava, Valentine are (according to google) the first two parts of a trilogy about 33-year-old Valentine who is carrying on her family's couture wedding shoe business.


Of course, she has her share of romantic rendezvous along the way which were entertaining and heartbreaking all at the same time.

The thing I loved most about these books is that Valentine struggled to decide what was most important in her life - work and her passion for it or love. I think that's something we can all relate to in one way or another.

My to-read book pile is getting mighty low this week... what are you reading??

14 Classy Comments:

Ashley said...

I haven't found anything that has caught my eye unfortunately. These sound great =) I am going to have to get to the book store or library and pick these up =)

Abby C. said...

Loved the Big Stone Gap series you recommended, so I'll definitely be checking out this new series too. I added a couple of Katherine Center books to my list after reading reviews from another blogger.

The Ratpack said...

I'm reading the Pioneer Woman's Black Heels to Tractor Wheels book, and I love it!! It's the story of how she and her husband met, and while it reads kinda like a Harlequin Romance novel, I can't put it down! I love a light, fluffy read every now and then!

Ashley said...

Definitely putting these into my to read pile! Thanks for the rec. :)

Piper Jacquelyn said...

I count on you and a few other bloggers to give me inspiration for what to read - thanks for these two titles, I will add them onto the ol' Amazon list!

Meg said...

Ooh, I loved both of these! Trigiani is a wonderful writer, and I loved Valentine's big and complicated family.

If you're looking for a fun read, I highly recommend Melissa Ford's Life From Scratch... total escapism and lots of fun -- plus, it's about a blogger! I blew through it in no time and couldn't get enough.

designHER Momma said...

your book choices make me giggle. in a good way...

Allison said...

That is a good book choice. Good thoughts on career and love..such a big thing in our lives.

I'm going to jump on the bandwagon eventually with the book site..just not right now. :)

Becky said...

I just got done going on a vacation and I read on the plans "A Bump on the Road" by Maureen Lipinski. A funny chick-lit to read!

Sarah said...

Ooh I can't wait to read these!

francisco Villalobos said...

perfumes
Perfume Aroma: How Things have Moved Ahead in Time Meta Description: To know more on perfume aroma, you should go ahead and read the article. Since ancient times, humans have tried to enhance or mask their own body odor by applying perfume, since perfumes tend to emit pleasant natural aroma. Perfumes are mostly prepared from various man-made and natural ingredients and are applied on clothing as well as directly on skin. They are also used in the making of cosmetics and cleaners or also for the manufacture of room fresheners. Owing to variations in body temperature, odor and chemistry, none of the perfumes will produce the exact same smell on two different people. The word perfume has originated from Latin word "per", which means "through" while "fumum," means "smoke." A lot of antique perfumes were created from natural oils that were extracted from plants, by means of compressing and steaming. Then the extracted oil was burned, in order to release scent in the air. These days, perfumes are widely used in the production of bar soaps. While all scented liquids that are used for enhancing body smell are termed as perfumes, in reality, real perfumes are classified as essences or extracts that include a portion of oil, treated in alcohol. The United States is considered to be the world's leading perfume manufacturing country with yearly sales adding up to more than a few billions of dollars. The most common natural ingredients, used in perfume making are flowers, spices, grasses, fruit, roots, wood, resins, leaves, balsams, gums, as well as animal secretions. Apart from these balsams, substances like petrochemicals, alcohol, coal tars and coal are also used in perfume production. Certain plants, like lily of the valley, are not capable of producing oils naturally. If truth be told, only around 2,000 out of 250,000 identified plant species produce flowers, which possess the much needed essential oils. As a result, synthetic chemicals have to be applied to rebuild the fragrances of non-oily stuffs. Synthetic chemicals also produce unique fragrances, which cannot be acquired from nature. A number of perfumes use animal products as major ingredients. For instance, musk produced by male deer, ambergris collected from the sperm whales and castor produced by beavers. Animal ingredients are frequently used, since they play the role of fixatives, which help perfume to slowly evaporate as well as release odors, for extended period of time. Other fixatives are used in production of perfumes are mosses, coal tar, resins and synthetic chemicals. At times water and alcohol are used, in order to dilute elements, present in perfumes. It is actually the alcohol percentage to scent, which decides whether a perfume is cologne or "eau de toilette". So, if you wish to purchase some good perfumes, for personal use or to give as gifts, to your near and dear ones, then you must visit theperfumearoma.com site. This one of a kind site offers wide range of perfumes, which are 100% authentic and are reasonably priced. Here you will find all braded perfumes that one possibly can think of. Apart from perfumes, this online company presents extensive collection of aftershave products, bath and body washes, moisturizers as well as body and hand lotions, deodorants, bubble baths, soaps and hand washes, shampoos, separate
By francisco Villalobos on www. the perfume aroma.com on 1/19/11

francisco Villalobos said...

perfumes
Perfume Aroma: How Things have Moved Ahead in Time Meta Description: To know more on perfume aroma, you should go ahead and read the article. Since ancient times, humans have tried to enhance or mask their own body odor by applying perfume, since perfumes tend to emit pleasant natural aroma. Perfumes are mostly prepared from various man-made and natural ingredients and are applied on clothing as well as directly on skin. They are also used in the making of cosmetics and cleaners or also for the manufacture of room fresheners. Owing to variations in body temperature, odor and chemistry, none of the perfumes will produce the exact same smell on two different people. The word perfume has originated from Latin word "per", which means "through" while "fumum," means "smoke." A lot of antique perfumes were created from natural oils that were extracted from plants, by means of compressing and steaming. Then the extracted oil was burned, in order to release scent in the air. These days, perfumes are widely used in the production of bar soaps. While all scented liquids that are used for enhancing body smell are termed as perfumes, in reality, real perfumes are classified as essences or extracts that include a portion of oil, treated in alcohol. The United States is considered to be the world's leading perfume manufacturing country with yearly sales adding up to more than a few billions of dollars. The most common natural ingredients, used in perfume making are flowers, spices, grasses, fruit, roots, wood, resins, leaves, balsams, gums, as well as animal secretions. Apart from these balsams, substances like petrochemicals, alcohol, coal tars and coal are also used in perfume production. Certain plants, like lily of the valley, are not capable of producing oils naturally. If truth be told, only around 2,000 out of 250,000 identified plant species produce flowers, which possess the much needed essential oils. As a result, synthetic chemicals have to be applied to rebuild the fragrances of non-oily stuffs. Synthetic chemicals also produce unique fragrances, which cannot be acquired from nature. A number of perfumes use animal products as major ingredients. For instance, musk produced by male deer, ambergris collected from the sperm whales and castor produced by beavers. Animal ingredients are frequently used, since they play the role of fixatives, which help perfume to slowly evaporate as well as release odors, for extended period of time. Other fixatives are used in production of perfumes are mosses, coal tar, resins and synthetic chemicals. At times water and alcohol are used, in order to dilute elements, present in perfumes. It is actually the alcohol percentage to scent, which decides whether a perfume is cologne or "eau de toilette". So, if you wish to purchase some good perfumes, for personal use or to give as gifts, to your near and dear ones, then you must visit theperfumearoma.com site. This one of a kind site offers wide range of perfumes, which are 100% authentic and are reasonably priced. Here you will find all braded perfumes that one possibly can think of. Apart from perfumes, this online company presents extensive collection of aftershave products, bath and body washes, moisturizers as well as body and hand lotions, deodorants, bubble baths, soaps and hand washes, shampoos, separate
By francisco Villalobos on www. the perfume aroma.com on 1/19/11

francisco Villalobos said...

perfumes
Perfume Aroma: How Things have Moved Ahead in Time Meta Description: To know more on perfume aroma, you should go ahead and read the article. Since ancient times, humans have tried to enhance or mask their own body odor by applying perfume, since perfumes tend to emit pleasant natural aroma. Perfumes are mostly prepared from various man-made and natural ingredients and are applied on clothing as well as directly on skin. They are also used in the making of cosmetics and cleaners or also for the manufacture of room fresheners. Owing to variations in body temperature, odor and chemistry, none of the perfumes will produce the exact same smell on two different people. The word perfume has originated from Latin word "per", which means "through" while "fumum," means "smoke." A lot of antique perfumes were created from natural oils that were extracted from plants, by means of compressing and steaming. Then the extracted oil was burned, in order to release scent in the air. These days, perfumes are widely used in the production of bar soaps. While all scented liquids that are used for enhancing body smell are termed as perfumes, in reality, real perfumes are classified as essences or extracts that include a portion of oil, treated in alcohol. The United States is considered to be the world's leading perfume manufacturing country with yearly sales adding up to more than a few billions of dollars. The most common natural ingredients, used in perfume making are flowers, spices, grasses, fruit, roots, wood, resins, leaves, balsams, gums, as well as animal secretions. Apart from these balsams, substances like petrochemicals, alcohol, coal tars and coal are also used in perfume production. Certain plants, like lily of the valley, are not capable of producing oils naturally. If truth be told, only around 2,000 out of 250,000 identified plant species produce flowers, which possess the much needed essential oils. As a result, synthetic chemicals have to be applied to rebuild the fragrances of non-oily stuffs. Synthetic chemicals also produce unique fragrances, which cannot be acquired from nature. A number of perfumes use animal products as major ingredients. For instance, musk produced by male deer, ambergris collected from the sperm whales and castor produced by beavers. Animal ingredients are frequently used, since they play the role of fixatives, which help perfume to slowly evaporate as well as release odors, for extended period of time. Other fixatives are used in production of perfumes are mosses, coal tar, resins and synthetic chemicals. At times water and alcohol are used, in order to dilute elements, present in perfumes. It is actually the alcohol percentage to scent, which decides whether a perfume is cologne or "eau de toilette". So, if you wish to purchase some good perfumes, for personal use or to give as gifts, to your near and dear ones, then you must visit theperfumearoma.com site. This one of a kind site offers wide range of perfumes, which are 100% authentic and are reasonably priced. Here you will find all braded perfumes that one possibly can think of. Apart from perfumes, this online company presents extensive collection of aftershave products, bath and body washes, moisturizers as well as body and hand lotions, deodorants, bubble baths, soaps and hand washes, shampoos, separate
By francisco Villalobos on www. the perfume aroma.com on 1/19/11

francisco Villalobos said...

perfumes
Perfume Aroma: How Things have Moved Ahead in Time Meta Description: To know more on perfume aroma, you should go ahead and read the article. Since ancient times, humans have tried to enhance or mask their own body odor by applying perfume, since perfumes tend to emit pleasant natural aroma. Perfumes are mostly prepared from various man-made and natural ingredients and are applied on clothing as well as directly on skin. They are also used in the making of cosmetics and cleaners or also for the manufacture of room fresheners. Owing to variations in body temperature, odor and chemistry, none of the perfumes will produce the exact same smell on two different people. The word perfume has originated from Latin word "per", which means "through" while "fumum," means "smoke." A lot of antique perfumes were created from natural oils that were extracted from plants, by means of compressing and steaming. Then the extracted oil was burned, in order to release scent in the air. These days, perfumes are widely used in the production of bar soaps. While all scented liquids that are used for enhancing body smell are termed as perfumes, in reality, real perfumes are classified as essences or extracts that include a portion of oil, treated in alcohol. The United States is considered to be the world's leading perfume manufacturing country with yearly sales adding up to more than a few billions of dollars. The most common natural ingredients, used in perfume making are flowers, spices, grasses, fruit, roots, wood, resins, leaves, balsams, gums, as well as animal secretions. Apart from these balsams, substances like petrochemicals, alcohol, coal tars and coal are also used in perfume production. Certain plants, like lily of the valley, are not capable of producing oils naturally. If truth be told, only around 2,000 out of 250,000 identified plant species produce flowers, which possess the much needed essential oils. As a result, synthetic chemicals have to be applied to rebuild the fragrances of non-oily stuffs. Synthetic chemicals also produce unique fragrances, which cannot be acquired from nature. A number of perfumes use animal products as major ingredients. For instance, musk produced by male deer, ambergris collected from the sperm whales and castor produced by beavers. Animal ingredients are frequently used, since they play the role of fixatives, which help perfume to slowly evaporate as well as release odors, for extended period of time. Other fixatives are used in production of perfumes are mosses, coal tar, resins and synthetic chemicals. At times water and alcohol are used, in order to dilute elements, present in perfumes. It is actually the alcohol percentage to scent, which decides whether a perfume is cologne or "eau de toilette". So, if you wish to purchase some good perfumes, for personal use or to give as gifts, to your near and dear ones, then you must visit theperfumearoma.com site. This one of a kind site offers wide range of perfumes, which are 100% authentic and are reasonably priced. Here you will find all braded perfumes that one possibly can think of. Apart from perfumes, this online company presents extensive collection of aftershave products, bath and body washes, moisturizers as well as body and hand lotions, deodorants, bubble baths, soaps and hand washes, shampoos, separate
By francisco Villalobos on www. the perfume aroma.com on 1/19/11

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